Bury the hatchet. What about the handle?

“She hurt me, she hurt me real bad. It was a petty issue, but hurtful nonetheless. I had told her before now that if she ever did anything to hurt me again, it would bring about the end of our friendship.” Was that right?
“After the incident I cut all ties with her and decided to focus on the solid things in my life, like work and my relationship.
I am happy because I have forgiven her and I’m moving on with my life, but talking to her can only occur in our dreams. I am done with her.”
This is a young man’s admission about someone that once made him smile, a friend. The type that could only be found once in a lifetime.
Without concerning ourselves with what might have caused the drift, is it absolutely possible to forgive someone without communicating with them? If it is then how can the wrong doer be absolutely sure that he or she is truly forgiven?
The great book speaks clearly about how many times one should be forgiven. Jesus told peter when he asked, “… Seventy times seven.”
Was he (the above) right by making up his mind to cut ties with this friend?
The great book also says to forgive, if you have anything against someone, so that the father will forgive you when you ask too.
If our guy claims to have forgiven his friend, especially over something petty, why the estrangement?
What would have been of us if God forgave us and left us all to ourselves?
If she is truly forgiven, why does he feel the need to be alienated from her? Is it possible to forgive and alienate?

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